• 2018-09-11

MOTOR CITY RENAISSANCE

Detroit is cool again. 

Still tough. 

But, more real.

Five years ago, Detroit was America's poster city for urban decay. The city was $18 billion in debt with abandoned homes dotting the landscape.

BUT, LIKE A PHOENIX RISING FROM THE ASHES OF BANKRUPTCY, DETROIT IS REINVENTING ITSELF, BUILDING BY BUILDING AND BLOCK BY BLOCK. 

The product of a modern-day renaissance; Motown is becoming synonymous with an emerging spirit of rebirth and revival.


Historically, The Renaissance, refers to a period from the late 14th century and extended for another 200 years. Originating from Florence, The Renaissance produced immortals such as Copernicus, Galileo, Da Vinci and Michaelangelo; geniuses who inspired men and women to wake up, think for themselves and see new possibilities with wide eyes open.



Over a century ago, Detroit was its own version of Florence and what we now see in Silicon Valley; where innovation and entrepreneurship exploded like a V-8 engine, with enough economic horsepower to ignite the rest of the world. With the decay and collapse of giant corporations such as GM and Chrysler, coupled with a bloated municipal government riddled with corruption and cronyism, Detroit was reeling from pillar to post. But, like a bloodied boxer getting back up from the canvas, a new artistic and entrepreneurial spirit is coming together to fuel Motown’s comeback.

Put the top down.

Pop some Bob Seger,  Kid Rock, and  Eminem on the tape deck and cruise on over for the Motor City Renaissance on The Reinvention Chronicles.



                 “I come from Detroit where it’s rough and I’m not a smooth talker.”  EMINEM



p.s…. one of those modern-day Medici’s referred to in The Motor City Renaissance is one-time realtor Dan Gilbert of Quicken Loans who takes every opportunity he can to wave the Motown flag. In 2010, Quicken Loans moved its HQ and 1,700 of its team members to the downtown core and today, Gilbert-owned businesses employ more than 17,000 people in Detroit. Once quoted as saying that “Detroit is where muscle meets brains”, Gilbert explains the relationship between culture and results and the implications for any company or community considering reinvention.